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You’ve taken the first step to a healthier choice in bread. And oh so yummy!

How to Make a Sourdough Starter

tools you’ll need:

  • food scale
  • quart size mason jar (wide mouth is better)
  • piece of fabric, cheesecloth, or coffee
  • rubber band
  • all-purpose flour
  • rye flour
  • filtered water (check out Berkey, I love mine!)
  • spatula
  • label of some sort (tape, sticky note, etc.)

Let’s begin and learn how to feed a sourdough starter.

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We’ll do this together!

Sourdough Starter – DAY 1 (9 am)

  1. Place your scale on the counter and set it to grams. Weigh the mason jar. Write the weight of the jar on a piece of tape/sticky note and set aside. Clear the scale by pressing the Tare button and bringing the scale back to zero.
  2. Pour 100 grams of filtered, room temperature water to the mason jar. Zero out the scale.
  3. Add 50 grams of All-Purpose flour to the water in the mason jar. Zero out the scale.
  4. Now add 50 grams of Rye flour to the mixture and stir to combine.
  5. Scrap down the sides and smooth the top as best you can.
  6. Place the tape (with the weight of the jar written on it) on the side of jar with the top of the tape at the top of the sourdough starter.
  7. Store the mason jar in a warm cozy place.

The first feeding will be 24 hours from now.

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Tape Placement

Sourdough Starter – DAY 2 (9 am)

Your starter have risen some or it may not have. If it hasn’t risen any, don’t be discouraged just yet. Look at the bottom and if you see even just one or two bubbles, move on to the next step. If you do not, through out the starter, wash the mason jar well and start again. Don’t give up, you’ll get this!

  1. Weigh your starter. We need to leave 75 grams of starter in the jar to feed. So we need to remove all but 75 grams of starter from the jar. And this is how we do it. Example: on day 2, my jar and starter, weighed 635 grams. My mason jar weighs 416 grams and I need 75 grams of starter. 416 + 75 = 491 grams. Therefore, I will need to remove enough of the starter for my mason jar, with starter, to weigh 491 grams.
  2. Pour 75 grams of filtered, room temperature water into jar with the remaining starter. Stir to combine.
  3. Add 50 grams of all purpose flour to the starter.
  4. Now add 25 grams of rye flour and stir to combine.
  5. Scrape down the sides and smooth the top.
  6. Adjust the tape if need be, cover, store the mason jar in its little spot.
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Sourdough Starter – DAY 2 (9 pm)

Your starter may have risen a little or not at all. No worries! If you see even one or two bubbles at the bottom of the jar, you are good to go and ready to continue.

  1. Weigh your starter. You want to leave 75 grams of the starter in the jar to feed. My jar, with the starter, weighed 635 grams. My mason jar weighs 416 grams and I need 75 grams of starter. 416 + 75 = 491 grams. That means that I need to remove enough of the starter from my mason jar to a total weight (jar & starter) to 491 grams.
  2. Pour 75 grams of filtered, room temperature water into the jar with the remaining starter. Stir to combine.
  3. Add 50 grams of all purpose flour to the starter.
  4. Now add 25 grams of rye flour and stir to combine.
  5. Scrape down the sides and smooth the top.
  6. Adjust the tape if need be, cover, store the mason jar in its little spot.

As you can see, feeding sourdough starter at 9 pm is exactly the same as the 9 am feeding. Continue this same process, feeding every morning and evening, until your sourdough starter has doubled in size within an 8 hour period. It is not unusual for the starter to appear dead on day 4, but as long as there is some form of life, keep going.

Once your sourdough starter has doubled in size, you are ready to make bread. How exciting is that!?! Give yourself a little pat on the back because you have just made your very own sourdough starter and you are one BIG step closer to making a made from scratch loaf of sourdough bread.

Join me, I’d love to have you along.

Find more “Made from Scratch” recipes:

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DISCLAIMER:

Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that I receive a small commission on qualified purchases at no additional cost to you. I only recommend products that I would use myself. See my full disclosure here.

HELPFUL NOTES:

  • You MUST use a quality flour. King Arthur has always worked well for me.
  • The all-purpose flour, the rye flour, and the water has to be the same temperature.
  • Use filtered water only.
  • Don’t Forget to zero out the scale after each addition.

Happy Baking!